Σάββατο, 23 Φεβρουαρίου 2013

ssd for mac via thunderbolt - speed your imac project

Ok. at the moment i figured out the following:

Yes we can use the thunderbolt adapter to plug in a ssd.

We have two solutions.

1. Fixed drives that are plug and play directly to thunderbolt. 
Plus: no effort, fast, ready to use raid solutions.
Minus: Expensive, some devices are making noise.

Some solutions.

500-600$ - (CAREFUL- amazon comments - TO NOISY)

LaCie Little Big Disk (2T non ssd or 512GB SATAIII SSD)




$202.99 - 120 GB (amazon) (no extra thunderbolt, so no chain or second display available)

LaCie Rugged USB3 Thunderbolt Series portable SSD is fast and affordable


But after the above i show that
 

So seems that the solutions is the GoFlex with another ssd disk. But be aware! works fine with 128GB ssds BUT NOT with 240GB and above. Seems that needs the proper case, based on power problems. 

So if you want also to use your extra thunderbolt for display then you need to buy that

Seagate GoFlex Desk Thunderbolt Adapter (STAE122) at 169.99 $



here you can see a demonstration with the official boxed seagate disks 


Chineses are the perfect testers! That the proof that all works. It's reinstall also the os X mountain lion on ssd256 samsung. 




Some notes about Windows 7 installation ssd here (seems to be caution with bios settings for better performance)



WARNING!!!!
What's going on? A short Google session shows that everyone has problems with portable TB adapter from Seagate when used with SSD bigger then 240GB. for example 

So we need a ssd with the lower - lowest power consumption and good stats.. 

to be continued


 




Google Maps API keys now open all iOS developers

http://arstechnica.com/apple/2013/02/google-maps-api-keys-now-open-all-ios-developers/


Google Maps API keys now open all iOS developers

Google Maps API keys now open all iOS developers

The move could mean more developers using Google's data instead of Apple's.

The Google Maps SDK for iOS is now open to all iOS developers—not just those who get approval for API keys through Google. The move almost guarantees more third-party iOS apps will use Google's data instead of Apple's, though it's still too early to tell whether the change will significantly affect Apple or the use of its own mapping APIs.
Google announced it had updated its SDK for iOS in a blog post late Thursday, noting updated support for ground overlays, gesture control, and geodesic polylines. The company didn't specifically discuss the increased openness of its mapping API, but observers were quick to notice—Google now makes its API keys available to all iOS developers through its API Console. This means developers who don't want to use Apple's mapping API can use Google's without having to apply and wait for approval.
Google first announced its Maps SDK for iOS last December, not long after Apple kicked the mapping giant out of its iOS 6 Maps app. Google released its own Maps app for iOS, too, and made its (arguably superior) data store available to third-party developers through the SDK. Devs still can't use turn-by-turn navigation in their apps while using Google's SDK, but the increased access to Google's data is sure to improve what is available to users on the App Store.
On Thursday, Google also released a sample app with its SDK to help developers learn more about Google Maps:
The Google Maps SDK for iOS v1.1

Πέμπτη, 21 Φεβρουαρίου 2013

You can't switch language - windows 7 pro

It's bug! Devs know about it.

 You can switch language  - just press button Shift _twice_ holdin Alt []

so. press the 2 shifts together with the Alt and solves temporarily the problem
... to be continue


solved: 
Just remove the keyboard - apple and put a simple one US. 
after that add another lang and all will be solved:) .. 

damn keyboard apple!


Τρίτη, 19 Φεβρουαρίου 2013

ssd in raid in one packet :) with thunderbolt

Pegasus j2


Promise Pegasus J2 review:Finally, a RAID-enabled, superfast, supercompact Thunderbolt drive

See all models 
Slide 2
Slide 3
Slide 4
Slide 5
Slide 6
Previous
Next

CNET Editors' Rating

3.5starsVery good
 
Review Date: 
 

Average User Rating

0.0starsNo reviews. Write a review
The good: The Pegasus J2 portable Thunderbolt drive is very fast, optionally bus-powered, compact, and offers RAID configurations.
The bad: The Pegasus J2 is expensive, doesn't include USB 3.0 or a Thunderbolt cable, and requires a power adapter to offer top speed.
The bottom line: Uniquely designed, the Pegasus J2 is perfect for deep-pocketed mobile users who want a compact, superfast, and RAID-enabled storage device, but not the rest.
The Promise Pegasus J2 may not be the first portable Thunderbolt drive on the market, but it's still one of a kind.
Despite that it's more compact than any other Thunderbolt portable drive I've reviewed, the J2 manages to be a dual-volume drive, offering users the option of using it as a RAID 0 (default) or RAID 1 drive. On top of that, it uses two solid-state drives as its storage to provide fast data speeds, no matter in what type of RAID you want to configure it in.
The J2 is far from perfect, however. It lacks support for other connection types, such as USB, and it requires an external adapter to offer top performance. It's expensive, too, costing about $800 for 256GB or $1,500 for 512GB, and you have to spend another $50 or so for the much-needed Thunderbolt cable, which isn't included.
That said, if you want a portable drive that offers fast performance, portability, style, and data security, the Pegasus J2 is currently the only one that fits that bill. If you're willing to sacrifice the RAID capability, also check the Buffalo MiniStation Thunderbolt, or the LaCie Rugged Thunderbolt for much better pricing and flexibility.
Drive typeExternal Thunderbolt hard drive
Connector optionsThunderbolt
Available capacities256GB, 512GB
Product dimensions (WLH)2.91 inches x 4.33 inches x 0.81 inch
Weight4.23 ounces
Capacity of test unit256GB (SSD)
OSes supportedMac OS X 10.6.8 or later
Design and features
The Pegasus J2 is just slightly larger than a deck of playing cards, and is about as thick. One of the drive's ends is slightly thicker than the other; at the thicker end, you'll find a Thunderbolt port and a power port. The power port is covered by a rubber lid and is not needed to use the drive. Similar to the rest of the portable Thunderbolt drives I've reviewed, the J2 is bus-powered; you just need to plug it into a computer with a Thunderbolt cable.
Unlike the other drives, however, by design, the J2 only works at only some 30 percent of its data-rate capacity when bus-powered. If you want the drive to work at its best, you do need to plug in the included power adapter. According to Promise, the reason for this is because the Thunderbolt technology supplies only 10W per port, which is not enough juice for the J2's two internal drives to offer optimal performance. In my testing, there was indeed a huge difference in terms of the drive's performance between using it bus-powered and with the adapter (more on this below).
The drive's adapter can be used anywhere in the world since it supports AC input in the 100-to-240-volt range and comes with changeable prongs to fit any type of wall power outlets. If that's not travel-friendly enough, the J2's package also includes a nice leather carrying case.
The Pegasus J2 comes with more than you need in terms of power plugs while lacking the much-needed Thunderbolt cable.
The Pegasus J2 comes with more than you need in terms of power plugs while lacking the much-needed Thunderbolt cable.
(Credit: Dong Ngo/CNET)
The fact the drive has just one Thunderbolt port means that it can only be used at the end of a daisy chain in case you want to use multiple Thunderbolt devices together. This is not a big deal, though, since all portable Thunderbolt drives I've reviewed come with just one port. The drive offers no USB or FireWire support; consequently it can only be used with Thunderbolt-ready computers and is a lot less flexible than USB 3.0/Thunderbolt drives, such as the LaCie Rugged Thunderbolt or the Buffalo Mini Station.

speed up iMac with a ssd and thunderbolt :)

First choice: DANGER - all reviews writes LOUD NOISY SOLUTION (updated)
Second choice:  external raid with thunderbolt
third review about external general: 


LaCie Thunderbolt SSD boot drive for blistering performance

It was a big mistake to delete the SSD. I should have waited. For the past ten months the iMac has been nothing but frustration when compared with my lowly late-2010 11in MacBook Air. Disk access speeds are abysmal (in comparison) and starting or restarting from sleep takes far too long.
I investigated the options for retro-fitting an SSD alongside the standard 1TB. As we all know, Apple will not do this, but I found a couple of companies that said they could. There is also the iFixit kit which was highlighted a couple of weeks ago, but a DIY jobs is well outside my modest capabilities. Having watched two Asian enthusiasts wresting with an iMac in the above YouTube clip, I was more than ever convinced this is not for me.
Partly out of inertia and largely because I didn\u2019t want to lose the iMac for even a week, I did nothing.

Alternative strategy

\"\"I started to look for an alternative solution and eventually hit on LaCie\u2019s pricey but well-received Little Big Disk external Thunderbolt SSD. I reasoned that the speed of the Thunderbolt connection could make the LaCie into a viable boot drive.
It is received wisdom that an external drive should never be used as a boot drive except in emergency. In the days of mechanical drives and USB connections, this was undoubtedly prudent advice. But Thunderbolt and SSDs have changed all that. It is now a viable option.
After rummaging around other users\u2019 experiences I became convinced it would be a feasible option. It isn\u2019t a cheap one, though, because the 240GB LaCie (which actually consists of two striped 120GB drives in a neat casing) sells in the Apple Store for \u00A3699. I did check around but couldn\u2019t find it anywhere else, let alone cheaper. We\u2019re at the (cash) bleeding edge of technology here, I am afraid. Next year it will be a different story.

Phenomenal improvements

\"\"Yesterday I bit the bullet and bought the drive (plus one of Apple\u2019s expensive \u00A339 Thunderbolt cables). Installing the Little Big Disk and making it into the default boot drive took a couple of hours and was super easy. I will cover the details later.
The results are absolutely phenomenal. My once lethargic iMac has been totally transformed. It boots quicker than the MacBook Air, wakes from sleep within a couple of seconds. Programs launch with only one icon bounce, when ten was the previous norm. In short, it is fast.

Read at 490 Mbps

\"\"The statistics are nothing short of astounding. Before adding the LaCie, the iMac\u2019s 7,200 rpm drive was recording slothful read/write speeds of 48 and 49 Mbps. After installing the Lacie these speeds have increased to 490/253 Mbps. Actually, the 490 is right off the scale at the end of the red zone on the BlackMagic disk speed test. The real speed could be even higher than 490 Mbps for all I know.
The iMac is now flying along and the LaCie is performing perfectly, although the internal fan is very noisy. I have positioned the drive as far away from the computer as the Thunderbolt cable will allow, but the fan noise is still intrusive. That said, it\u2019s a small price to pay for the blistering improvement in performance.

Internal option

I have no doubt that installing a 256GB SSD into the iMac, in addition to the 1TB hard-disk, would be a cheaper option, even taking labour into account. Replacing the HDD with a 256GB SSD would be even cheaper because it doesn\u2019t involve adding the necessary bracket to accommodate a second drive.
The LaCie, on the other hand, offers a hassle-free alternative, particularly since getting inside the iMac is not for the faint hearted.  It does have the advantage that you can keep the drive for alternative use after the iMac is sold.
Incidentally, if I you are in the market for a new iMac try to rustle up the extra cash for the SSD, either alone or in tandem with the mechanical HDD. You will not regret it. But, if you don\u2019t order it you certainly will suffer regret.
This has been a hugely successful operation which has transformed my user experience on the iMac. Read speeds have rocketed by a factor of ten while write speeds have increased fivefold. This is a result by any standards.

Faster than the Air

What is even more surprising is the improvement over the MacBook Air\u2019s 128GB SSD which was my previous benchmark for \u201Cfast\u201D. The Lacie reads 3.5 times faster and writes over twice as fast. Bear in mind the Air is a late-2010 model and the current machines, with faster processors and newer SSDs, will probably equal or even surpass the performance of the LaCie.

Doing the deed

Setting up an external disk such as the LaCie as a main boot drive is very simple, expecially if you use a backup utility such as SuperDuper!
The first thing I did when I returned from the Apple Store with the new drive was to check out the storage on the iMac. I was plotting and planning while sitting on the westward-bound Underground, so I had a strategy already worked out.
It turned out I had used 250MB of the 1TB internal drive, so clearly that was not going to fit on the LaCie. I identified 85GB of media (mostly movies I had bought from the iTunes store) and I was able to move ths block to an old backup drive. In any case they can now be downloaded again from the store if needed.
Finally, I ended up with 165 GB which would fit on the LaCie. When I get a moment I can do more housekeeping and move less important stuff to an alternative location if necessary.

SuperDuper!

\"\"Having pruned the iMac\u2019s internal drive to manageable proportions, I simply plugged in the LaCie to the second and last Thunderbolt port (the other is occupied by my Cinema Display) and fired up SuperDuper!.
SuperDuper! is perhaps the best backup utility for the Mac; at any rate it is the one I rely on. It costs $27.95 direct. In common with other similar cloning backup utilities it isn\u2019t available from the App Store because it plumbs system depths that Apple doesn\u2019t approve of. Everyone uses it, though, and there is no need to worry. An excellent alternative is Carbon Copy Cloner which is actually free (or, preferably, you should make a small donation to the developer).

Set up

I set the utility to copy the entire iMac drive to the LaCie and then to make the external drive bootable. As you can see from the screenshot, the SuperDuper! routine included repairing permissions on the iMac drive, erasing the LaCie and then copying the entire contents of the internal drive to the external SSD.
If you wish, you can leave bulky data on the internal drive, just as you would if, for instance, you had purchased a dual-disk iMac. However, if you want to see maximum benefit from the SSD you should at least have the applications folder on the faster drive. I chose to put everything there, largely because in my case it was feasible.
After the copy, SuperDuper! made the LaCie bootable and, finally, set it as the startup disk. The entire process took 87 minutes at an average (slow) 35 Mbps, obviously limited by the access speed on the mechanical hard disk in the iMac. This, I hope, is the last time I will see such a glacial pace.
After this process was complete I logged out of my user account before switching off the computer. If you do not do this, you will find yourself in the wrong user account, the one on the internal disk, after re-booting from the LaCie. This is potentially confusing and not immediately obvious.
\"\"Just log off, then switch off the computer. Reboot and the LaCie will take over. The internal 1TB disk will mount as a second disk. For the time being I have left all old the stuff on the iMac disk until I am absolutely sure there are no problems. Eventually, though, I will reformat this disk and reinstall OS X so it becomes an alternative boot disk. There will also be the best part of 1TB available for storage and management of larger media files and suchlike.

A word on FileVault and Time Machine

If you have been running FileVault encryption on the iMac, as I had been doing, you will find that it is not possible to convert the twin-disk LaCie to FileVault. I didn\u2019t realise until I tried and got the error \u201CCannot convert an AppleRAID volume to core storage\u201D. The situation with a single-volume SSD might be different, although I am not sufficiently clued up to know. It\u2019s a pity, but it is not a deal breaker.
\nTime Machine will need some tweaking. I deleted the old Time Machine volume, set to back up from the internal 1TB disk and established new backup routine from the LaCie (which is now seen as the home volume) to the remote location (in my case a partition on my Drobo FS). I also excluded the internal 1TB disk from Time Machine backup since, for the moment, there is nothing there that I absolutely need. I can change this when I have sorted out what to keep on the internal disk.\n

Wrap up


If you are buying a new computer, an SSD drive is the most effective way of increasing performance. In the real world, in day-to-day activities, it makes more difference, subjectively of course, than the speed of the processor or the size of the RAM.
But if you already own a computer with a mechanical drive and a Thunderbolt port, an external SSD such as the LaCie is a sure-fire way to put new life into it. So far, I can thoroughly recommend it. I will report further if problems are encountered at any stage.
","wysiwyg":{"engine":"code","isSource":false,"mode":"htmlmixed","source":""}}" data-block-type="2" id="block-502231cde4b0fc3d5b93f830" style="position: relative; clear: none; z-index: 1; padding-left: 25px; padding-right: 25px; word-wrap: break-word; padding-bottom: 24px;">
if you like this article please see my follow-up in August 2012: The cheaper option​
Last May I bought a new 27in iMac as soon as it was announced. Because of my positive experience with solid-state drives (on two MacBook Airs and a MacBook Pro) I ticked the box for the expensive dual-disk option, including a 256GB SSD boot drive. When I discovered there would be a six-week delay, I decided to delete the SSD and, instead, go for the 7,200 rpm 1TB hard disk. To ensure speed I chose the fastest i7, the 3.4GHz, processor and 8 GB of RAM.

Big mistake

It was a big mistake to delete the SSD. I should have waited. For the past ten months the iMac has been nothing but frustration when compared with my lowly late-2010 11in MacBook Air. Disk access speeds are abysmal (in comparison) and starting or restarting from sleep takes far too long. 
I investigated the options for retro-fitting an SSD alongside the standard 1TB. As we all know, Apple will not do this, but I found a couple of companies that said they could. There is also the iFixit kit which was highlighted a couple of weeks ago, but a DIY jobs is well outside my modest capabilities. Having watched two Asian enthusiasts wresting with an iMac in the above YouTube clip, I was more than ever convinced this is not for me. 
Partly out of inertia and largely because I didn’t want to lose the iMac for even a week, I did nothing.

Alternative strategy

I started to look for an alternative solution and eventually hit on LaCie’s pricey but well-receivedLittle Big Disk external Thunderbolt SSD. I reasoned that the speed of the Thunderbolt connection could make the LaCie into a viable boot drive.
It is received wisdom that an external drive should never be used as a boot drive except in emergency. In the days of mechanical drives and USB connections, this was undoubtedly prudent advice. But Thunderbolt and SSDs have changed all that. It is now a viable option.
After rummaging around other users’ experiences I became convinced it would be a feasible option. It isn’t a cheap one, though, because the 240GB LaCie (which actually consists of two striped 120GB drives in a neat casing) sells in the Apple Store for £699. I did check around but couldn’t find it anywhere else, let alone cheaper. We’re at the (cash) bleeding edge of technology here, I am afraid. Next year it will be a different story.

Phenomenal improvements

Yesterday I bit the bullet and bought the drive (plus one of Apple’s expensive £39 Thunderbolt cables). Installing the Little Big Disk and making it into the default boot drive took a couple of hours and was super easy. I will cover the details later.
The results are absolutely phenomenal. My once lethargic iMac has been totally transformed. It boots quicker than the MacBook Air, wakes from sleep within a couple of seconds. Programs launch with only one icon bounce, when ten was the previous norm. In short, it is fast.

Read at 490 Mbps

The statistics are nothing short of astounding. Before adding the LaCie, the iMac’s 7,200 rpm drive was recording slothful read/write speeds of 48 and 49 Mbps. After installing the Lacie these speeds have increased to 490/253 Mbps. Actually, the 490 is right off the scale at the end of the red zone on the BlackMagic disk speed test. The real speed could be even higher than 490 Mbps for all I know.
The iMac is now flying along and the LaCie is performing perfectly, although the internal fan is very noisy. I have positioned the drive as far away from the computer as the Thunderbolt cable will allow, but the fan noise is still intrusive. That said, it’s a small price to pay for the blistering improvement in performance.

Internal option

I have no doubt that installing a 256GB SSD into the iMac, in addition to the 1TB hard-disk, would be a cheaper option, even taking labour into account. Replacing the HDD with a 256GB SSD would be even cheaper because it doesn’t involve adding the necessary bracket to accommodate a second drive.
The LaCie, on the other hand, offers a hassle-free alternative, particularly since getting inside the iMac is not for the faint hearted.  It does have the advantage that you can keep the drive for alternative use after the iMac is sold.
Incidentally, if I you are in the market for a new iMac try to rustle up the extra cash for the SSD, either alone or in tandem with the mechanical HDD. You will not regret it. But, if you don’t order it you certainly will suffer regret.
This has been a hugely successful operation which has transformed my user experience on the iMac. Read speeds have rocketed by a factor of ten while write speeds have increased fivefold. This is a result by any standards.

Faster than the Air

What is even more surprising is the improvement over the MacBook Air’s 128GB SSD which was my previous benchmark for “fast”. The Lacie reads 3.5 times faster and writes over twice as fast. Bear in mind the Air is a late-2010 model and the current machines, with faster processors and newer SSDs, will probably equal or even surpass the performance of the LaCie.

Doing the deed

Setting up an external disk such as the LaCie as a main boot drive is very simple, expecially if you use a backup utility such as SuperDuper!
The first thing I did when I returned from the Apple Store with the new drive was to check out the storage on the iMac. I was plotting and planning while sitting on the westward-bound Underground, so I had a strategy already worked out.
It turned out I had used 250MB of the 1TB internal drive, so clearly that was not going to fit on the LaCie. I identified 85GB of media (mostly movies I had bought from the iTunes store) and I was able to move ths block to an old backup drive. In any case they can now be downloaded again from the store if needed.
Finally, I ended up with 165 GB which would fit on the LaCie. When I get a moment I can do more housekeeping and move less important stuff to an alternative location if necessary.

SuperDuper!

Having pruned the iMac’s internal drive to manageable proportions, I simply plugged in the LaCie to the second and last Thunderbolt port (the other is occupied by my Cinema Display) and fired up SuperDuper!.
SuperDuper! is perhaps the best backup utility for the Mac; at any rate it is the one I rely on. It costs $27.95 direct. In common with other similar cloning backup utilities it isn’t available from the App Store because it plumbs system depths that Apple doesn’t approve of. Everyone uses it, though, and there is no need to worry. An excellent alternative is Carbon Copy Cloner which is actually free (or, preferably, you should make a small donation to the developer).

Set up

I set the utility to copy the entire iMac drive to the LaCie and then to make the external drive bootable. As you can see from the screenshot, the SuperDuper! routine included repairing permissions on the iMac drive, erasing the LaCie and then copying the entire contents of the internal drive to the external SSD.
If you wish, you can leave bulky data on the internal drive, just as you would if, for instance, you had purchased a dual-disk iMac. However, if you want to see maximum benefit from the SSD you should at least have the applications folder on the faster drive. I chose to put everything there, largely because in my case it was feasible.
After the copy, SuperDuper! made the LaCie bootable and, finally, set it as the startup disk. The entire process took 87 minutes at an average (slow) 35 Mbps, obviously limited by the access speed on the mechanical hard disk in the iMac. This, I hope, is the last time I will see such a glacial pace.
After this process was complete I logged out of my user account before switching off the computer. If you do not do this, you will find yourself in the wrong user account, the one on the internal disk, after re-booting from the LaCie. This is potentially confusing and not immediately obvious.

Just log off, then switch off the computer. Reboot and the LaCie will take over. The internal 1TB disk will mount as a second disk. For the time being I have left all old the stuff on the iMac disk until I am absolutely sure there are no problems. Eventually, though, I will reformat this disk and reinstall OS X so it becomes an alternative boot disk. There will also be the best part of 1TB available for storage and management of larger media files and suchlike.

A word on FileVault and Time Machine

If you have been running FileVault encryption on the iMac, as I had been doing, you will find that it is not possible to convert the twin-disk LaCie to FileVault. I didn’t realise until I tried and got the error “Cannot convert an AppleRAID volume to core storage”. The situation with a single-volume SSD might be different, although I am not sufficiently clued up to know. It’s a pity, but it is not a deal breaker.
Time Machine will need some tweaking. I deleted the old Time Machine volume, set to back up from the internal 1TB disk and established new backup routine from the LaCie (which is now seen as the home volume) to the remote location (in my case a partition on my Drobo FS). I also excluded the internal 1TB disk from Time Machine backup since, for the moment, there is nothing there that I absolutely need. I can change this when I have sorted out what to keep on the internal disk.

Wrap up

If you are buying a new computer, an SSD drive is the most effective way of increasing performance. In the real world, in day-to-day activities, it makes more difference, subjectively of course, than the speed of the processor or the size of the RAM.
But if you already own a computer with a mechanical drive and a Thunderbolt port, an external SSD such as the LaCie is a sure-fire way to put new life into it. So far, I can thoroughly recommend it. I will report further if problems are encountered at any stage.